7 Ugliest Mouths In Animal World

Myxine’s “Alien” Mouth

Myxine is a genus of hugfish. Its voracity is a big problem for fishermen because these worm-like creatures swallow everything they see including the fish in the nets. As ironic as it may sound, myxines don’t use their ugly teeth to eat every time. They can absorb the food through their skin, so oftentimes they just swim around some dead fish and absorb its “yummy” ptomaine.

Leatherback Sea Turtles’ “Knives”

We used to believe that turtles are nice and friendly creatures. Well, most of them are, but leatherback sea turtles are not that harmless. Their mouths are “equipped” with deadly teeth that help them eat small fishes and mollusks. Awful rows of knife-sharp teeth resemble stalactites in a cave and look really threatening.

Dracula Fish’s Vampire Teeth

 

As the name suggests, Dracula fish’s teeth resemble vampire’s canines. No wonder: this type of fish lives in Amazon River and needs some really efficient tools for survival. If you take a look into its mouth you’d see the rows of sharp vampire-like teeth, and some of them can be as long as 6 inches!

The Velvet Belly Lanternshark’s “Saws”

These creepy predators never hunt in the daylight. They come out at night and haunt marine mammals and fishes. The size of their teeth relative to the size of the body is the biggest one in animal world. Due to its tiny size, the lantenshark attacks its victim spontaneously, cuts a piece of flash off and swims away as fast as it can. Thus, the victim doesn’t die and gets away with a scar.

Penguins’ “Deadly Belt Conveyer”

Everybody loves penguins – they are so funny, clumsy and cute! But if you take a look into their oral cavity you’d find lots of sharp teeth… everywhere! The upper and lower parts of the beak and even tongue are covered with teeth. They swallow their food as a whole and teeth and tongue work together as a belt conveyer that moves the food in one direction.

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